Das Haus der Tödlichen Doris
An Paenhuysen presents: "Die Galerie Eisenbahnstraße befindet sich in der Manteuffelstraße"
30.AUGUST 18:00 - 20:00
with Multiples of the Galerie Eisenbahn artists: Lucius Burckhardt, Chris Dreier, Ueli Etter, Karl-Heinz Eckert, Heinz Emigholz, Hannes Hauser, Birgit Knop, Sabine Maria van der Linden, Michael Morris, Wolfgang Müller, Max Müller, Eva-Maria Ocherbauer, Moritz Reichelt, Martin Schmitz, Christian Stock
7pm Lecture
Dreiwerkraum
Prinzenstrasse 96
10969 Berlin-Kreuzberg

As of July 14, 2019, Das Haus der Tödlichen Doris, founded by Wolfgang Müller in 1987, is directed by An Paenhuysen. The archival material of the post-punk band Die Tödliche Doris is shown in new contexts and updates. The house presents short and small format "eventualities" for this purpose. It is not about exclusivity but the intimate atmosphere allows for a higher concentration on the individual. The eventualities are addressed to artists, art producers, and other professionals.

The House of The Deadly Doris has an archive dedicated to West-Berlin’s subculture in the 1980s. One big box is filled with invitations, photos, and multiples of Galerie Eisenbahnstraße. Galerie Eisenbahnstraße was, despite its name, not a gallery, nor was it situated in the Eisenbahnstraße. The project space, founded by Uelli Etter and Wolfgang Müller in 1986, was located in the Manteuffelstraße in Kreuzberg. In the year 1849, Manteuffelstraße was named after the reactionary Prussian interior minister Otto Theodor Freiherr von Manteuffel, who was part of the counterrevolutionary epoch after the failed 1848 revolution. In 1986, Galerie Eisenbahnstraße renamed, at least symbolically, the Manteuffelstraße after its parallel street, unifying a train (‘Eisenbahn’) and a street (‘Straße’) in one word. Accompanied by the multiples of Galerie Eisenbahnstraße (for each event, or rather ‘expression’ (‘Äußerung’), a limited edition was sold), Dr. An Paenhuysen, director of The House of The Deadly Doris, will talk about this box in the archive and open it up to the art of language: what’s in a name?

Photo Credit: Felix Huber